John Pepper Clark is Dead

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John Pepper Clark, a famous Nigerian Poet, Playwright who also published as J.P. Clark is dead. Born on April 6, 1935, he died at 85. His death occurred in the early hours of Tuesday, October 13 2020 as announced by the family.

The statement signed by Prof.C.C. Clark for the family reads, “The Clark-Fuludu Bekederemo family of Kiagbodo Town, Delta State, wishes to announce that Emeritus Professor of Literature and renowned Writer, Prof. John Pepper Clark has finally dropped his pen in the early hours of today, Tuesday, October 2020.

“Prof. J.P. Clark has paddled on to the great beyond in comfort of his wife, children, and siblings, around him.

“The family appreciates your prayers at this time. Other details will be announced later by the family.”

J.P. Clark has been one of those principal Nigerian poets whose works have been studied far and worldwide. He schooled in Nigeria till his first degree in English from the University of Ibadan and then went on to work both at UI and then later at the University of Lagos. While in these two places, he was actively engaged in literary activity, being the founder of the student poetry magazine, The Horn at the University of Ibadan, and also co-editor of the literary journal Black Orpheus when he was a lecturer at the University of Lagos.

Clark studied a year at Princeton, after which he published America, Their America (1964), which was a criticism of middle-class American values and black-American lifestyles. He is widely published.

PUBLICATION BY J.P.CLARK

Preparing for War, Emergence of Modern U.S  Army -1815 -1917 (2017)

Abiku – Poem (2013

A Lot from Paradise -1999

Collected Poems (1958 -1988)

Bikoroa Plays(1985)

A Reed in the Tide – A Selection of Poems (1970)

The Examples of Shakespeare – 1970

A Decade of Tongues – Selected Poems (1958 and 1968)

America, Their America – 1964

Casualties – Poem (1966 and 68)

Ozidi Zaga -1966

 

 

 

 

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